Welcome to the Rudloe and environs website.

 

Here you will find news, articles and photos of an area that straddles the Cotswold Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in north-west Wiltshire.

 

Contributions in the form of articles or photos are welcome. Even those with completely contrary views to mine!

 

Thanks to the website builder 1&1 and Rob Brown for the original idea.

 

Rudloescene now, in January 2014, has a sister, academic rather than anarchic, website about Box history here: http://www.boxpeopleandplaces.co.uk/

It contains thoroughly professional, well-researched articles about Box and its people.

 

Contact rudloescene through the 'Contact' page.

rudloescene
rudloescene

Ash, sycamore, oak and ash in a view of Leafy Lane Wood on 4th May 2018 & wild garlic on 12th May

The large sycamore at the north-eastern entrance to Leafy Lane Wood is in flower (the 'tassels' shown here) on 4th May 2018
Both of the beeches that fell in Leafy Lane Wood in December/January are now in leaf.
A close-up of leaves on one of the fallen beeches
An easterly view at the eastern end of Leafy Lane Wood showing the significant carpet of dog's mercury at this end of the wood
A maple by the main path (right of way 107A) in Leafy Lane Wood
Close to the central glade in Leafy Lane Wood
Right of way 107A, the principal path through the wood
Looking east from the central glade in the wood
Treetops (inc. sycamore) in Leafy Lane Wood on 12th May 2018
Wild garlic at the eastern end of the wood on 12th May - the leaves can be used in salads
Wild garlic (ramsons) at the eastern end of Leafy Lane Wood on 12th May 2018
Ramsons with a celandine leaf carpet below
Still at the eastern end of the wood with patches of wild garlic
A carpet of wild garlic surrounds this beech
Spring flowering gives the flowers more sunlight
Whilst the leaves of wild garlic may be eaten, in salads for example, dog's mercury in the foreground is poisonous
The wild garlic has spread considerably in recent years
There's a smell of garlic in the air but to get a strong whiff, tear off a leaf and crush it
Light penetrating the woodland on 12th May 2018
Looking out from the wood towards the small meadow
Cow parsley amongst the Scots pines
A patch of wild garlic (and some cow parsley) towards the centre of the wood
Cow parsley at the western end of the wood
The landmark trees at the centre of the playing fields from the wood
Cow parsley at the western end of the wood with a horse chestnut
A large patch of lamium galeobdolon (there'll be a test later) in the middle of the wood. The common name is yellow archangel.
The flowers of yellow archangel
Cow parsley around a beech
Spring greens at the eastern end of the wood
One of the two fallen beeches at the eastern end of the wood
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© Paul Turner